The Memphis Bell Is Back

THE MEMPHIS BELLE

Almy Stock Photo

The refurbished Memphis Belle will be unveiled this Thursday, May 17,  in the World War ll Gallery at the National Museum of the Air Force in Dayton, Ohio.  The fabled  plane was the star of William Wyler’s celebrated documentary of  1944..  The making of the film is presented in detail in Mark Harris’ s book Five Came Back.  See Rick’s Flicks post for 9/29/17.

The B-17 “Memphis Belle” and crew. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Acknowlegment:  Mitch Stacy, Associated Press

NEXT REGULAR FRIDAY POST May 24

Until then,
See you at the movies,
Rick

ODDS AND ENDS, SEGMENTS AND SPLICES

AWARDS

The insanity of awards season is upon us.  The New York Film Critics Circle has announced its awards for 2017.  The once prestigious body which often made more thoughtful, meaningful choices than the Academy  —   Charles Chaplin did win; so did Great Garbo, twice  —  has announced that this year’s best picture is neither the best directed nor the best written.  And the best directed film is not the year’s best.  Neither is the best written.  And so it goes.  This body of voters is comprised of four of the country’s most discriminating and knowledgeable critics.  Is a puzzlement.

MORE REFLECTIONS ON THE SEASON OF AWARDS

“The wonderful thing about the Academy Awards is that they are fundamentally trivial.  To pretend otherwise is to trivialize movies.”  (A.O. Scott in “Are Oscars Worth All This Fuss?” from the New York Times, 2/24/08).

Coupled with this from his same article:  “…I am…bothered by the disproportionate importance that the Academy Awards have taken on, and by the distorting influence they exercise over the way we make, market and see movies in this country.”

But my favorite passage in Scott’s article comes with his discussion of what is now called The Oscar Show.  He comments on “the overproduced underwhelming renditions of the nominated songs.”  Hear!  Hear!

REMINDER for my readers in Akron or Cleveland or nearby:  The Cleveland Cinematheque is showing The Earrings of Madame de… this Saturday and Sunday.  (See Rick’s Flicks for December 22.)

NEXT FRIDAY POST JANUARY 19

Until then,
See you at the movies,
Rick

MORE DREAMS FROM THE FIELD

RECOMMENDED READING

In the June 18 Akron Beacon Journal Clint O’Connor interviews Akronite actor Dwier Brown who played the father in Field of Dreams and later wrote the book If You Build It  —  a Book About Fathers, Fate and Field of Dreams.  O’Connor’s article contains some good and useful information about the film; and, most importantly, O’Connor writes knowingly and sensitively of a film which treats the father/son motif as knowingly and sensitively as few films have.  (Clint O’Connor, “‘Field of Dreams’ Isn’t Just a Film.”  Akron Beacon Journal, 6/18/17).

Field of Dreams
Philip Alden (writer/director)
1989
based on the book Shoeless Joe by William P. Kinsella

  •          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *         *          *          *

On Thursday, June 22 in the Akron Beacon Journal Clint O’Connor appears again, this time interviewing Akron’s own (San Francisco’s own, cinema’s own) Kurtiss Hare.  In an illuminating full-page piece, O’Connor talks with Hare who, through the Nightlight Cinema, brings the best and most challenging of world cinema right to the door of northeast Ohio.

Akron Beacon Journalhttp://www.ohio.com

NEXT FRIDAY POST July 14
Until Bastille Day, then,
See you at the movies,
Rick

 

ONE MORE DELAY

Rick’s Flicks asks you to accept one more apology.  Hardware problems beyond our control delay the promised post until June 30.  Please hold your breath until then, and return.

Thank you.

Sincerely,
Rick

 

PAST AND FUTURE GHOSTS

RECOMMENDED READING

An important article for film buffs:  Nick Bilton, “That’s All Folks!” in Collector’s 23rd Annual Special Edition, 2017 of Vanity Fair.  Beginning on p.140.  This is a meaningful article for anyone interested in the past and/or the future of Hollywood moviemaking or interested in any aspect of film.

*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *

MOVIES ARE EVERYWHERE

…and especially in good books.

*

“Eliot Ness?  You mean like Robert Stack?”
“So it’s not like the movies?”   –   “Is anything?”

That first quotation from Casey Daniels’ paranormal mystery Graveyard Shift has to do with television, but  quotable cinematic goodies dot the pages throughout the latest comic but scary and suspenseful adventures of sleuth Pepper Martin.

“Crawling inside the house was another story.  /  I got in, and not gracefully, and found myself in a back room that was obviously used as a sort of den.  My flashlight app revealed a flat-screen TV in one corner,a couch across from it, and movie posters on the walls:  Road to Perdition, Goodfellas, Donnie Brasco. /   I pictured Dean in there watching hour after hour of endless gangster movies, feeding his obsession day and night.”

Another entry:  “With the door fully open and Caleb standing back, I toed the doorway, totally stunned and feeling like Dorothy must have when she plunked down into a Technicolor Oz.”

Yet another entry and the finest of all:  “…I knew something was up as soon as my knuckles hit the front door.  /  It swung open. / I might not have a big brain, but I’m nobody’s fool and I’d seen plenty of horror movies.  /  I knew this was not a good sign, but just like all those heroines in all those horror movies, I went in, anyway.”  (Hear!  Hear!)

Graveyard Shift by Casey Daniels.  Great Britain and USA, Severn House, 2017

NEXT FRIDAY POST May 19

Until then,
See you at the movies,
Rick