SHORT TAKES; A POTPOURRI OF THE RECENTLY VIEWED — PLUS MEMORABLE QUOTES

GREAT MOVIE LINES OF ALL TIME:

Joan Leslie & Eddie Albert

JL: You don’t LOOK like a lion tamer.
EA: How many’ve you met?

THE WAGONS ROLL AT NIGHT (1941)

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Serious Reflection for All MovieGOers

My local newspaper this morning contained a Washington Post article by Cecilia Kang reporting that four new films starring Adam Sandler and a sequel to Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon will show on Netflix without being released to theaters.  Netfilx will make the Sandler movies.  The Weinstein Company “swung the deal” for the Crouching Tiger sequel…”  Kang begins her article:  “Not coming first to a theater near you…”  She continues, “The move has the potential to disrupt the business food chain that has fed Hollywood for decades.”

Those of us who love GOING to the movies need to keep aggressively doing so, supporting our film society, supporting the special venue, supporting the theater that shows the kind of film we want to see.

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RECENTLY VIEWED  —  FROM 2004 BACK TO 1927

Colin Farrell Back to Back

His versatility and profound talent shine in two films I saw within a 24-hour period.  I came away from them impressed not so much with his knowing, and leading from, his strengths as by his apparent ability to play any role handed to him.  As a playfully murderous, murderously playful Jesse James in a fantasy called American Outlaws he is photogenic, touching, scary and hilarious. In A Home at the End of the World he is heartbreakingly believable in a film that swings its pendulum between hectic humor and bemused melancholy.

En Effeuillant la marguerite (Plucking the Daisy)

The single- joke plot goes on a bit too long, but this is filled with French charm.  Brigitte Bardot and Daniel Gélin are both very good.  The pace is right, and there is an excellent score.  Highlight:  Bardot, discovering that people she knows are in the audience, is side-splittingly funny trying to be modest while stripping on stage.

Flesh and the Devil

This is Clarence Brown’s movie.  Garbo  —  mea culpa  —  over-vamps, and John Gilbert is over-the-top all way round.  Even Lars Hanson is not as effective as usual.  (What must Garbo have thought of her erstwhile Swedish co-star’s American presence?)  Brown tells his story with pictures.  The camera’s study of the gift bracelet is a good example, expressing Garbo’s character and motivation.  88 years later the sex in this film is still coolly hot.

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SCORSESE ON WILDER

Scorsese calls Billy Wilder’s The Apartment “one of the most beautiful black-and-white Cinemascope pictures ever made.”  He continues:  “the sets were designed by the great Hungarian/French art director Alexander Trauner (who also designed Children of Paradise and Welles’ Othello), and by the time the story has ended you know every object in that apartment, and you’ll probably be able to draw a floor plan.  Wilder and his co-writer I.A.L. Diamond, along with Trauner, the set decorator Edward G. Boyle, the actors Jack Lemmon and Shirley MacLaine and the cinematographer Joseph LaShelle…work out all the action with the greatest care:  every movement and gesture is inseparable from the space itself.”  (The quotation is from Martin Scorsese’s programming column in TCM’s September issue of Now Playing.)

1960 was a year in which Hollywood’s best film actually won the Academy Award as best picture of the year.

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For Northeast Ohio

ReelMassillon continues at the Lincoln Theatre in downtown Massillon as Kurtiss Hare presents Terry Gilliam’s The Zero Theorem.  This should be a visual feast and probably a thoughtful one as well.  Christoph Walz, Matt Damon, David Thewlis and Tilda Swinton.  7:00 tonight.  Let’s GO to a movie.

NEXT Friday Post October 16.  Please stop by.

Until then,
SEE YOU AT THE MOVIES
Rick

 

 

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